9 Mta opening
February 19, 2018 - Soft opening of "9 Mta" Craft Beer Area.  

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9 Mta Team
2020-05-24

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Beer Masterclass
Our overall aim is to help you in discovering craft beer world and leading you through an exciting new journey. These Beer Classes are our  secret weapon in this mission. Beer class brings together people, who would like to feel the special trace of craft beer's blooming aroma and ever consuming taste sip by sip. The program consists of theoretical introduction and beer tasting. Participants have a wonderful possibility to learn more about the history of craft beer, its brewing, fermentation and ageing methods, learn about history of the leading breweries of the world. Try different styles of craft beer.  Join us, travel into the  the ever-growing world of craft beer , explore different styles of craft beer and discover the best one for you. for further information, contact us. Cheers to you!  

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9 MTA
2020-04-11

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On the Pass to Discoveries
2017 - the beginning of "9 Mta" discoveries path!     We full heartedly believe that everyone has to explore and discover the taste of the real beer. We've travelled all around the world, got to know a lot of interesting and passionate people, tried and explored vast variety of craft beer from all around the globe in order to create a place for you where you can discover and enjoy the best beer from thousands of miles away. 9Mta, translated as nine mountains, meant to signify a long road less traveled, became the hub for craft beer scene in Georgia. A pioneer in its concept, the bar offers 24 taps of leading international breweries such as: Mikkeller, Nogne, BrewDog, BRLO, Stone, ToOl, Omnipollo and its own namesake brand represented by five distinct styles.  With a dazzling tap list, you can feel free to explore over 70 different bottle/can varieties. All of the beers, presented to you here, are nurtured by the tireless and passionate brewers, whose happiness is growing sip by sip. They carefully handpick the ingredients and their sparkling artistry never fails to surprise us.  Each beer savored by you, will always leave the special trace of its blooming aroma and ever consuming taste. we hope, you will never stop exploring the ever-growing world of craft beer. Cheers to you!

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9 Mta Team
2020-05-25

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First Georgian cicerone - Zaza Chadashvili
 Meet first Georgian cicerone (beer sommelier) Zaza Chadashvili  Zaza is a Law practitioner. 5 years ago, his life turned upside down when the love of beer led him to the Warsaw Craft beer fest, where he discovered unique world of craft beer previously unbeknownst to him. Back in the day, only industrial and dull industrial beer was represented in Georgia, which forced him to order beer from international websites, bug his friends abroad and purposefully travel in order to try new and exciting flavors that craft beer world had to offer. Throughout these years, he had tried and discovered over 1000 different craft beer varieties. His tedious hobby and passion were significantly eased up with the opening of 9 MTA. After one year of being our loyal customer, he finally joined our team. Zaza decided to turn his hobby to a newfound-secondary specialty to help Georgian costumers in discovering craft beer world and leading them through an exciting new journey.  Consultation with Sommelier: +995 555 470 883 FB: https://www.facebook.com/zaza.chadashvili

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9 Mta
2020-04-01

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Beer Ingredients
The real reason for brewing Craft beer was the monotony of the existing beer market. Proponents of the first craft beer have declared open war to industrial beer producers. They believed that consumers deserved to taste real beer. This is the philosophy of craft beer - taste, quality, innovation and diversity. Over time, craft beer has gained popularity, so large businesses have also expressed interest and decided to produce craft beer, which was in complete disagreement with the philosophy of craft beer. It became necessary to establish an accurate definition of craft beer. What is a craft beer? 1. Craft beer is brewed in a small enterprise in small quantities. 2. Real craft beer is brewed only from high quality and high value malt and hops. 3. Craft beer has a seratonic effect, which creates a good mood and is tonic, which gives us energy. 4. Craft beer lovers have revived forgotten styles and also created new ones. 5. Craft beer is not pasteurized, does not contains chemicals. 6. A craft beer company must be independent and no industrial company or any other institutional investor must have a stake in more than 25% of its capital in order for the craft beer company to be highly focused on quality and customers. 7. Craft beer idea: more flavor, more taste, more character. Ingredients Craft brewers use a wide variety of ingredients to achieve the aroma, body, flavor and finish they desire in their beer. The main ingredients in most beer styles are high quality hops and malt,  water, and yeast. 1. Hops  Craft brewers use hops as chefs use spices Bitterness ranges: Restrained, moderate, aggressive, harsh Aroma and flavor ranges: Citrus, floral, fruity, green, herbal, onion/ garlic, pine, resinous, spicy, spruce, sweaty, tropical, woody • Hops deliver both resins and essential oils that influence beer’s aroma, flavor, bitterness, head retention, astringency and perceived sweetness. They also increase beer’s stability and shelf life. • Brewers today use well over 100 different varieties of hops worldwide, with hops grown in the U.S. contributing an estimated 30 percent of the global supply. • Though there are many varieties of hop plants, the hops used in beer generally fall into three categories: bittering, aroma and dual-purpose. Bittering hops contain more alpha acids and are used primarily to contribute bitterness, while aroma hops are used primarily to add flavor and aroma to beer. Dual-purpose hops can have higher alpha acid content, but also are used to contribute aroma compounds. Hop resins lend bitterness via alpha acids to balance the sweetness of malt sugars. When alpha acids are isomerized through boiling, ranges of bitterness can land anywhere from two IBUs (International Bitterness Units) to more than 100 depending on the beer style and brewer’s intention. • Alpha acid content of most hops ranges from 2 to 20 percent by weight. • Hops’ main essential oils influencing aroma and flavor are:  - Humulene (common in noble hops) · Woody/piney notes  - Myrcene (pungent; largest component of hop oil; can help indicate ripeness of hop cone)  · Green resin aromatics  - Caryophyllene · Spicy pepper notes - Farnesene  · Floral notes  - These oils volatize off when exposed to heat, so aroma and flavor hops are added at the end of the boil or during or after fermentation (a technique referred to as “dry hopping”). 2. Malt Malt is the soul of beer, as it contributes flavor, aroma, color and body. Malted Barley (Malt) Flavor ranges:  Bread flour, grainy, biscuit, bready, toast, caramel, pruny, roast, chocolate, coffee, smoky, acrid • Malt is detected in the aroma, flavor and appearance of a beer. • Malt has been called the soul of beer. It is the main fermentable providing the sugars that yeast use to create alcohol and carbonation. It is most often barley that has been malted by putting it through a series of moisture and temperature steps. • Malt is converted barley or other grains that have been steeped, germinated, heated, kilned (or roasted in a drum), cooled and dried, and then rested. • Fresh barley has a moisture content commonly around 13 percent. This is raised, often to more than 40 percent, until the barley begins to germinate. During the malting process it is dried to less than four percent moisture. • A wide variety of barley and other malts are used to make beer, including: pale malts (pilsner and pale tworow); higher-temperature kilned malt (Munich and Vienna); roasted/specialty malt (chocolate and black); and unmalted barley. Wheat malt is commonly used as well. • Malt adds fermentable and non-fermentable sugars and proteins that influence beer’s aroma, alcohol, astringency, body, color, flavor and head retention. 3. Water Beer is mostly water, which makes water quite an important ingredient. It provides minerals and ions that add various qualities to beer. Some brewers make their beer without altering the chemistry of their water sources. Many do modify the water to make it most suitable to deliver the beer characteristics they hope to highlight. • Common minerals include: Carbonate, calcium, magnesium, sulfate • Common taste descriptors include: Chalk, flint, sulfur pH, residual alkalinity, water hardness or softness and mineral content all come into play when brewing beer. Let’s take a look at these factors. pH pH power of hydrogen  measures the concentration of ions in a liquid. The pH scale runs from 0 (acidic) to 14 (alkaline), with 7 as the neutral midpoint. • Acidic (0-6) has higher Hydrogen concentration • Alkaline (8-14) has higher Hydroxide concentration Just like the Richter scale for earthquakes, pH is logarithmic. Every point on the pH scale is ten times greater or lesser in concentration than the point above or below it. For example: pH 4 is 1,000 times (103 or 10 x 10 x 10) more acidic than pH 7. 4. Hardness Hardness is the concentration of minerals in water. Water high in calcium/magnesium and bicarbonate/sulfate is said to be “hard.” Hard water is used in German-style Dunkels, Germanstyle Marzen/Oktoberfest beers, Vienna-style Lagers, Irish-style Dry Stouts, Scottish-style Ales and English-Style Pale Ales/ESBs. On the other end of the spectrum, water low in these ions is said to be “soft.” Soft water is used in Bohemian-style Pilseners. The presence of calcium sulfate (gypsum) enhances bitterness, but also can induce dryness and lend a low sulfitic character. This effect has been called the ‘Burton snatch,’ originating from beers made in Britain in the Burton-on-Trent area 5. Yeast and Microorganisms Yeast and other microorganisms eat sugars from malted barley and other fermentables, producing carbonation, alcohol and aromatic compounds. The flavor imparted by yeast differs based on yeast strain, temperature, time exposed to the beer, oxygen and other variables. Types of Yeast • Lager: Saccharomyces pastorianus. Often lends sulfuric compounds. Commonly referred to as bottom-fermenting. Most often ferments at cooler temperatures (45-55°F). • Ale: Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Generally produces more flavor compounds (esters). Commonly referred to as topfermenting. Most often ferments at warmer temperatures (60-70°F). • Weizen: Common to some German-Style Wheat beers. • Brettanomyces: Considered a “wild” yeast. Lends flavors like barnyard, tropical fruit and more. Byproducts of Fermentation Alcohol and CO2 are the main products of fermentation, but yeast and other microorganisms may produce many other byproducts that can add new flavors and aromas to the beer. These flavors will continue to change over time, especially for aged beers.  6. Carbonation(CO2) Visual: None, slow-, medium-, fast-rising bubbles Palate: Low, medium, high • Beer’s carbonation comes from carbon dioxide gas, which is a naturally occurring byproduct of fermentation. It can also be introduced into beer via force carbonation. • Nitrogen can also be added to beer, providing smaller bubbles and a softer mouthfeel compared to CO2. • Carbonation is measured in terms of volumes of CO2, which range from 1-3+ v/v (volumes of dissolved gas per volume of liquid) with 2.5-2.7 volumes being the most common. Source: Craftbeer.com      

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9 Mta Team
2020-06-01

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why beer and steak work so well together
Steak and beer are two of man’s best friends, so it’s not much of a surprise that the two pair so well together. But why, exactly, do they work as well as they do?  There’s a beer for every steak From mild ales and sour lambics to sweet stouts , there’s a nearly infinite number of brews. There are so many varieties that, no matter what kind of steak you’re cooking, you can find a beer to go with it. And a beer for every season. Brewers have gotten pretty creative with their recipes, especially when it comes to seasonal beers. Summer selections are infused with citrus, and winter warmers are laden with spices. And while there are plenty of combinations that should have never have been made, the seasonal selection can transform your steak dinner into a weather-appropriate repast. Beer’s bitterness balances steak’s fat. Sirloins, flat-irons, rib-eyes, and other heavily marbled steaks are known for their fatty, beefy flavors, but if you’ve ever bitten into a thick cut yourself, you know that all of that richness can be overwhelming. That’s where beer comes in. Hoppy beers with higher IBUs ,  like IPAs, light ales, and sessions, are perfect for cutting through the fattiness of steaks. When your tastebuds are overloaded with the meatiness of your meal, the beer acts like a mouth referee, bringing out steak’s flavor and minimizing its fattiness. Beer is cold, your steak is hot. Nothing satisfies the taste buds quite like a juicy steak right off the grill (or the pan) — that is, until you chase that hot piece of meat with a cold sip of beer. It’s a refreshing combo that even a chilled red wine just can’t recreate. The carbonation clears your palate before each bite. Want to taste everything on your plate? Every last bite of steak? Sipping beer between bites effectively clears your palate. The carbonation of beer and its natural effervescence scrubs your taste buds of any lingering flavors (it’s like Scrubbing Bubbles for your tongue), meaning every time you take a bite, it’ll feel like the first time. You will discover Black angus Rib-eye and T-bone steaks in 9 Mta’s menu. We have selected appropriate beer styles for those steaks, according to the recommendations of our sommelier and Chicago steak company. Pale ale & Sirloin Steak  Pale ale is a light-colored beer with strong flavors and a dry finish. Its fruity undertones pair well with the manly top sirloin. Red ale  & T-bone Steak Red ales are all excellent choices when it comes to T-bone steaks.  While writing this article, the delicious flavors of steak and beer are spinning in 9 Mta. Come to 9 Mta and taste the most delicious #Craftcouple   source:  https://www.mychicagosteak.com/   https://www.thekitchn.com/5-reasons-you-should-drink-beer-with-your-steak-240303

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9 Mta Team
2020-06-29

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